chickenhugs

earthsoldiers asked:

Hi! :) I really like your blog! I was wondering if you are vegan or vegetarian? And what do you do with their eggs? I'm just curious, I've seen a lot of people having different answers and opinions lately! Have a nice day!

chickenhugs answered:

Thank you!! I’m primarily vegetarian. Although my chickens are first and foremost my feathered bundles of joy, I do use/eat the eggs that my chickens lay because:

1) Eggs happen anyway; unlike with cows and milk production, chickens do not have to be bred to lay eggs - healthy hens of egg-laying age will pop out an egg once every day or two with or without a rooster. And fresh, ethically-sourced eggs are just awesome to have (and share) and are wayyyyyyy less likely to carry bacteria or other nasties. 

2) I wouldn’t know what to do with a half-dozen eggs every day if I didn’t use them somehow (SO MANY EGGS, WAT DO). I’d love to know what vegan chicken-owners do about them, though. Tell me your secrets! 

Annnd 3). Getting eggs from my own pet chickens is like a big F-U to the egg industry - I don’t buy their eggs, yet I still have all the eggs I could ever want. I’m having my cake and eating it too (literally). I imagine the egg industry being like, “GOOD LUCK BEING WITHOUT EGGS 5EVER” and I’m over here all, “lol why can’t I hold all these ethical eggs from happy hens.” 

I should add that all my chickens are entitled to living out the entirety of their natural lives (I mean, duh, I couldn’t imagine it any other way). I truly don’t care whether or not they lay eggs - just as long as I get my hugs in and they’re happy and healthy. 

There is this amazing chicken loving community on tumblr and I’ve often wondered about their stance on industrial farming. I love this response. We need more people who raise and know chickens as fantastic animals with big personalities who can tell the rest of the world that the way they’re treated in industrial situations is just not okay.

"BeachinwithChicken": Part One of My New Series, "When Big Ag Does Social Media."
There is so much to love about this effort by the National Chicken Council to appeal to millennials:
1. Even my mother, who has asked me no less than six times why everyone is putting “pound marks” all over “the Facebook” could have come up with a better hashtag then “beachinwithchicken”
2. What is what brings who together? 
3. Why is the grass transitioning into the sand? 
4. Starfish? Kind of looks like fried chicken…is that the idea? What is the idea?
5. Liked once by Dressing & Sauces. I couldn’t have made that up if i tried.
6. I am dead positive i’m the only person to ever look at this Facebook page who is simultaneously being solicited by Oscar Wilde and Being Liberal’s pages. 

"BeachinwithChicken": Part One of My New Series, "When Big Ag Does Social Media."

There is so much to love about this effort by the National Chicken Council to appeal to millennials:

1. Even my mother, who has asked me no less than six times why everyone is putting “pound marks” all over “the Facebook” could have come up with a better hashtag then “beachinwithchicken”

2. What is what brings who together? 

3. Why is the grass transitioning into the sand? 

4. Starfish? Kind of looks like fried chicken…is that the idea? What is the idea?

5. Liked once by Dressing & Sauces. I couldn’t have made that up if i tried.

6. I am dead positive i’m the only person to ever look at this Facebook page who is simultaneously being solicited by Oscar Wilde and Being Liberal’s pages. 

In Germany…a remarkably widespread and staunch opposition to one specific and little-known processing technique: the use of chlorine to wash chickens after slaughter. The process has even engendered its own vocabulary, and Das Chlorhünchen – chlorine chicken – is now a household word… Der Spiegel less subtly headlined the whole affair ‘Chlorhünchen im Shitstorm;’ no translation required.
The food movement — led by celebrity chefs, advocacy journalists, students and NGOs — is missing, ironically, the perspective of the people doing the actual work of growing food. Their platform has been largely based on how to provide good, healthy food, while it has ignored the core economic inequities and contradictions embedded in our food system.
Absolutely stunning facts in a new report by Michelle Simon of Eat Drink Politics on the dairy industry’s cozy, gross relationship with government. If they could find a way to put cheese on a fruit salad, these manipulative betches would. Also, “Process cheese is made from natural cheese” is making my head hurt it’s so empty and meaningless.

…many federal checkoff-funded dairy organizations make dubious health claims to market their dressed up junk foods. Would you believe that:
“Cheese can fit into almost any eating plan”;
“Process cheese is made from natural cheese”;
“Cheese contributes essential nutrients for good health”;
“Chocolate milk is the perfect balance of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates and protein—a combination that can’t be found in any other beverage”.
At a time when our nation is suffering from an epidemic of diet-related health problems, we cannot allow the decades of whitewashing by the dairy industry to continue. The assumption that eating dairy is essential to the diet has obstructed our ability to criticize federal government support for unhealthy forms of dairy.
It’s time to stop dancing around the federal checkoff programs by pretending they are privately-funded. As this report demonstrates, federal government administers, oversees, and approves almost every aspect of the dairy checkoff program. These funds are directly used to promote junk foods, which are contributing to the diseases our federal government is allegedly trying to prevent.

Absolutely stunning facts in a new report by Michelle Simon of Eat Drink Politics on the dairy industry’s cozy, gross relationship with government. If they could find a way to put cheese on a fruit salad, these manipulative betches would. Also, “Process cheese is made from natural cheese” is making my head hurt it’s so empty and meaningless.

…many federal checkoff-funded dairy organizations make dubious health claims to market their dressed up junk foods. Would you believe that:

  • “Cheese can fit into almost any eating plan”;
  • “Process cheese is made from natural cheese”;
  • “Cheese contributes essential nutrients for good health”;
  • “Chocolate milk is the perfect balance of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates and protein—a combination that can’t be found in any other beverage”.

At a time when our nation is suffering from an epidemic of diet-related health problems, we cannot allow the decades of whitewashing by the dairy industry to continue. The assumption that eating dairy is essential to the diet has obstructed our ability to criticize federal government support for unhealthy forms of dairy.

It’s time to stop dancing around the federal checkoff programs by pretending they are privately-funded. As this report demonstrates, federal government administers, oversees, and approves almost every aspect of the dairy checkoff program. These funds are directly used to promote junk foods, which are contributing to the diseases our federal government is allegedly trying to prevent.